Gordon Cowans

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1973Blade

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Sad news, former United midfielder Gordon Cowans has been diagnosed with alzheimer's disease, aged just 61. He didn't play for us long but was one of the best midfielders I have seen play for us, no one read the game better. All the best Gordon.
 

Cerberus Blade

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Sad news, former United midfielder Gordon Cowans has been diagnosed with alzheimer's disease, aged just 61. He didn't play for us long but was one of the best midfielders I have seen play for us, no one read the game better. All the best Gordon.
Indeed. I remember particularly him running the show in a Cup tie (FA Cup?) v Arsenal at the Lane when we beat them. He was a superb midfielder.

And a great player for Villa for many years before he joined our crusade.

Very sorry to hear about his Alzheimer’s. Terrible disease that affects a lot of people and those close to them. Poor lad.
 

Weasel

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Was a top top player for us, even when he was in the twilight of his career. Hardly moved from the centre circle all game but somehow managed to dictate the whole tempo of the game. Very similar to Stuart McCall in that respect. Only ran when necessary but oozed class, both like the best one of all who was Paul McGrath.

Three very very gifted footballers who we had the privilege to see in the red and white stripes.

61 is no age to be getting that disease. I wish Sid Cowans all the very best in his battle for health. Good luck Sid.
 

Carlton Blade

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I've said loads of times that I think the similarities between Cowans and Norwood are stark. Especially that faded pass that moves left to right in the air with the right instep. They are both such a delight to watch and do things that not many can. Cowans was a superb footballer and this is really sad
 

wizadry

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Very sad news!

Everyone has their favourites and over the years mine are, in no order, Kelly, Vas, Dane, McGrath, Fleck and last but not least Gordon Cowans, a truly wonderful footballer to watch, I hope he gets all the support he needs. ☹
 

Cheesebored

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Just checked wikipedia. Can't believe he only played 21 times for us. Fantastic footballer. Very sad news.
 

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Although I loved the Bassett period for the passion and intensity, watching Sid Cowans grace our midfield with such ease and simplicity was a pleasure. He was a fantastic player. Very sad news this. Losing my marbles is what I fear the most, and to start the process at just 61 must be horrific.
 

Karaoke Blade

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Sad news, same age as me 'n all.
A quality player who, although at the latter end of his career with the Blades, oozed class. I had the pleasure of meeting him in Hong Kong a few years back when he was training the Villa youngsters. A perfect gentleman.
Let's hope he can keep up his work with Villa for as long as possible.
 

Sheffsteel

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Was a top top player for us, even when he was in the twilight of his career. Hardly moved from the centre circle all game but somehow managed to dictate the whole tempo of the game. Very similar to Stuart McCall in that respect. Only ran when necessary but oozed class, both like the best one of all who was Paul McGrath.

Three very very gifted footballers who we had the privilege to see in the red and white stripes.

61 is no age to be getting that disease. I wish Sid Cowans all the very best in his battle for health. Good luck Sid.

Agree... knew Cowans and McGrath were top players in their pomp but never realised just how good both of them were.

They both oozed class and stood out like a sore thumb at Championship level.
 

Cerberus Blade

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Alzheimer’s just such a horrible thing, but at 61, is doubly cruel.
That’s about right though, age wise. It usually starts from around age 60. It varies a lot but often starts with an inability to remember things like people, or places, or events or even simple things like how to brush your teeth.

If it’s in the family there’s a greater chance you could develop it.

I saw my mother develop mental health problems. I’m not sure it was Alzheimer’s, probably not, but certainly some kind of dementia. She was always house proud and would never leave dishes out without washing them and putting them away. But in her 70’s I noticed she started stacking them up on the floor instead of putting them back in a cupboard. That was one of the first signs that something was wrong

Then she went into care, unable to cope for herself. And when I visited her she used to confuse me with my brothers and didn’t really know who I was.

It’s all quite distressing but there was a small upside to it. As a very independent woman she would never have wanted to be dependent on others or be in a care home. But her dementia meant she wasn’t fully aware of where she was or what her situation was.

I used to go and see her and she’d tell me how she’d had a great day out at the seaside and ate in a lovely restaurant. She’d been nowhere and ate in the care home, but she was happy!

So, there are some saving graces but in some ways it’s more painful for those close to the person than the person themselves sometimes.
 

derekacorah

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Class player, I vividly remember him and I’d have been young at the time he played. Hope he gets good treatment and his family can support him.
 

1973Blade

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This could be an ignorant question, but.could this be linked to the 'footballers heading footballs linked to dementia' debate? I'm not aware that Cowans was a particularly prolific header of the ball?
 

BushBlade

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This has really knocked me sideways. Cowans was probably the first footballer I really admired. An absolute quality player.

@stringsenior had Early Onset Alzheimer's and died a couple of years ago. Unfortunately this won't end well for Cowans. Life is an utter shit sometimes.
Sorry to hear that. It’s worse reading that than about Cowans tbh, as much as I have sympathy for him. It’ll be two years in May since I lost my dad. Probably the shittest thing to ever happen to me. So far.
 

Brownieblade

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Genuinely gutted tonight hearing this, as many will be aware when either reading any nonsense I post or replying to me etc the great one was my chosen avatar, best player I ever saw in a United kit, sadly for far to brief a moment but I genuinely count myself very lucky to have seen him
 

GRUMPY BLADE

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Genuinely gutted tonight hearing this, as many will be aware when either reading any nonsense I post or replying to me etc the great one was my chosen avatar, best player I ever saw in a United kit, sadly for far to brief a moment but I genuinely count myself very lucky to have seen him

Sad day for a top player, Villa were bloody lucky to have him at his peak.
 

XM657

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Just checked wikipedia. Can't believe he only played 21 times for us. Fantastic footballer. Very sad news.
That's a remarkable statistic, think most would reckon he didn't play for United for long but just 21 appearances. Eleven league and two FAC home games I saw him play and what a mark he left in mine and others memories in that short time. Excuse me repeating what has been said many times, excellent player for United a pleasure to watch. Our best regards Mr. Gordon S. Cowans from BDTBL.
 

petcharlie

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That’s about right though, age wise. It usually starts from around age 60. It varies a lot but often starts with an inability to remember things like people, or places, or events or even simple things like how to brush your teeth.

If it’s in the family there’s a greater chance you could develop it.

I saw my mother develop mental health problems. I’m not sure it was Alzheimer’s, probably not, but certainly some kind of dementia. She was always house proud and would never leave dishes out without washing them and putting them away. But in her 70’s I noticed she started stacking them up on the floor instead of putting them back in a cupboard. That was one of the first signs that something was wrong

Then she went into care, unable to cope for herself. And when I visited her she used to confuse me with my brothers and didn’t really know who I was.

It’s all quite distressing but there was a small upside to it. As a very independent woman she would never have wanted to be dependent on others or be in a care home. But her dementia meant she wasn’t fully aware of where she was or what her situation was.

I used to go and see her and she’d tell me how she’d had a great day out at the seaside and ate in a lovely restaurant. She’d been nowhere and ate in the care home, but she was happy!

So, there are some saving graces but in some ways it’s more painful for those close to the person than the person themselves sometimes.
Fully agree with what you have said .I to had to watch my mother suffer with Alzheimer's .At first I thought along with my family we imagine somethings she might have done or said,maybe there was a perfect explanation for what she might have done or said.It is when reality hits you and you realise this is not right that it is so hard.You see a very intelligent person you love and known all your life and has been there for you hit the buffers.If you are lucky they still seem happy if you are not they can become aggressive not at all like the person you know. Thats why it can effect the whole family more than the person who has Alzheimer's .It will be so hard for the Cowans family to watch him and not being able to help him. The one thing I did learn is not to contradict them no matter what they might say but just go along with it. It really frustrates them if you do not agree with their thoughts just go along with them no matter what.It is of little comfort but it makes life easier for you and them.Give them support and a big hug when ever you can.
 

Blade for Sale

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One of those players who seemed to see the game in slow motion. Remarkably simlar to McGrath in that respect, both ex-Villa and I'm glad they graced our ground even for a short time.

I can but wish him well in his battle, and pay tribute to a magnificent footballer. We weren't in a great place when he arrived but the guy shone like a beacon. Good luck Gordon.
 

Cerberus Blade

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Fully agree with what you have said .I to had to watch my mother suffer with Alzheimer's .At first I thought along with my family we imagine somethings she might have done or said,maybe there was a perfect explanation for what she might have done or said.It is when reality hits you and you realise this is not right that it is so hard.You see a very intelligent person you love and known all your life and has been there for you hit the buffers.If you are lucky they still seem happy if you are not they can become aggressive not at all like the person you know. Thats why it can effect the whole family more than the person who has Alzheimer's .It will be so hard for the Cowans family to watch him and not being able to help him. The one thing I did learn is not to contradict them no matter what they might say but just go along with it. It really frustrates them if you do not agree with their thoughts just go along with them no matter what.It is of little comfort but it makes life easier for you and them.Give them support and a big hug when ever you can.
A mate of mine had it far worse than me. His dad got it and was very difficult to live with. He became aggressive towards his wife and kids, he used to wandering off and get lost and have to be brought home by the police, who told the family not to let him out, but he was a bit of an escapologist as well! It got to the point where he couldn't look after himself, so his son had to stop working and stay home to care for him, as his mother was too old and frail. The strain it put on everyone else in the family was terrible.

I think it's very good advice that you give about "going along with it" and not contradicting them, especially if they are likely to get upset by it. At first it's hard to do that, because you don't want to see them deteriorating in front of your eyes and sometimes it's easy to feel like responding..."don't be silly, you know that's not the case" or whatever. I remember my mother saying to me, "I've not seen my mother for ages...is she still alive?". Her mother (my Grandmother) had been dead about 30 years at this point! That was a tricky one because if I'd said, "you know she's dead mother, she's been dead years" it could have destroyed her. And if I said, "she's fine, she's still alive" - that would have been a terrible lie and might have raised expectations which couldn't be realised. I can't remember exactly what I said now, but it was something along the lines of..."don't worry about that...tell me what you've been doing today?" In other words, I changed the subject quickly. And the thing is, I found she'd usually be easily distracted by that and then move on to talk about something else. It didn't feel comfortable, but it avoided what might have been a very distressing situation for her.

It's hard to know what's the right thing to do sometimes.
 

petcharlie

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A mate of mine had it far worse than me. His dad got it and was very difficult to live with. He became aggressive towards his wife and kids, he used to wandering off and get lost and have to be brought home by the police, who told the family not to let him out, but he was a bit of an escapologist as well! It got to the point where he couldn't look after himself, so his son had to stop working and stay home to care for him, as his mother was too old and frail. The strain it put on everyone else in the family was terrible.

I think it's very good advice that you give about "going along with it" and not contradicting them, especially if they are likely to get upset by it. At first it's hard to do that, because you don't want to see them deteriorating in front of your eyes and sometimes it's easy to feel like responding..."don't be silly, you know that's not the case" or whatever. I remember my mother saying to me, "I've not seen my mother for ages...is she still alive?". Her mother (my Grandmother) had been dead about 30 years at this point! That was a tricky one because if I'd said, "you know she's dead mother, she's been dead years" it could have destroyed her. And if I said, "she's fine, she's still alive" - that would have been a terrible lie and might have raised expectations which couldn't be realised. I can't remember exactly what I said now, but it was something along the lines of..."don't worry about that...tell me what you've been doing today?" In other words, I changed the subject quickly. And the thing is, I found she'd usually be easily distracted by that and then move on to talk about something else. It didn't feel comfortable, but it avoided what might have been a very distressing situation for her.

It's hard to know what's the right thing to do sometimes.
Well I can relate to everything you have said as you say sometimes you might have to tell a white lie or change the subject but it is hard but it is all done with the best intentions.As long as they accept what you say and they are happy what harm is there in a little white lie ,so much better than winding them up and upsetting them.I can remember mum showing me her new cardigan saying her mum had knitted it for her.I replied she is good at knitting I might ask her to knit me one.For some reason her face lit up she was so pleased that I am going to ask her mum to knit me one.Her mum of course had be dead for thirty years so why upset her telling the truth what good would that do.The answer it would do no good at all but she was happy.I will never go to bloody HEAVEN not to worry.😈
 

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